Archive of Hunting Reports

September2012

Outdoors Online Webcast

Posted: September 27, 2012

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online at http://gf.nd.gov

Dr. Doug Moen gives some First Aid Tips for scrapes, pokes, cuts, blisters, falls and other hazards of a North Dakota fall.  Click here to Watch!

The webcast can be seen on the following community access channels:

Grand Forks

•             GFTV Channel 2 – Saturday, 10 p.m.

•             UND Studio One Channel 3 – Monday, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.

Dickinson

•             Consolidated Channel 18 – Monday, 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.

Fargo

•             TV Fargo Channel 12 – Thursday, noon, and Sunday, 7 p.m.

Bismarck

•             Community Access Cable Channel 12, Thursday, 9:30 p.m.

Jamestown

•             Cable Services, The Replay Channel, CSi Channel 10

Minot

•             Cable Channel 19, Thursday, 6 p.m

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Fall Wetland Survey Conducted

Posted: September 25, 2012

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s annual fall wetland survey indicates fair wetland conditions statewide for duck hunting. However, hunters will need to plan ahead because most areas of the state are substantially drier than last year.

Wetland counts were down by about one-half in the northern tier of the state, and about two-thirds in the southern tier. However, waterfowl biologist Mike Szymanski said perception is everything. “Last year’s moisture level was one for the record books,” Szymanski said. “We are left with numbers of wetlands slightly lower than in 2005 and 2009, despite very dry conditions.”

Hunters may find shallow wetlands they hunted last year to be dry.  However, deeper semi-permanent wetlands will likely be holding water. “Most semi-permanent wetlands will also have a mud-margin between cover and the water’s edge,” Szymanski said. “That margin will vary a lot depending on the shape of the wetland, but should not be a major hindrance to hunters in most cases.”

The wetland survey is conducted in mid-September just prior to the waterfowl hunting season, to provide an assessment of conditions duck hunters can expect.

Opening day for North Dakota residents was Sept. 22 for ducks, coots, mergansers and geese. Nonresidents may begin hunting waterfowl in North Dakota Sept. 29.

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Check for ANS When Removing Structures

Posted:

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department requests local entities and water recreationists to monitor for new aquatic nuisance species infestations when pulling and storing fishing piers, boat docks and lifts prior to ice up.

Fred Ryckman, ANS coordinator, said it is especially important to look for zebra mussels. “Zebra mussels will attach to hard surfaces,” Ryckman said. “Inspecting these types of structures provides a good opportunity to determine if mussels may be present in the respective water body.”

To date, adult zebra mussels have not been found in any North Dakota waters.

If mussels are found, citizens are requested to leave the suspicious mussel attached, take a digital picture, and report findings immediately to a local Game and Fish Department district office.

Pictures of zebra mussels are available on the 100th Meridian Initiative website at 100thmeridian.org/.

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Youth Pheasant Weekend Oct. 6-7

Posted: September 24, 2012

North Dakota’s two-day youth pheasant season is Oct. 6-7. Legally licensed residents and nonresidents ages 15 and younger may hunt roosters statewide.

Resident youth hunters, regardless of age, must possess a fishing, hunting and furbearer certificate and general game and habitat license. Nonresident youth hunters from states that provide a reciprocal licensing agreement for North Dakota residents qualify for North Dakota resident licenses. Otherwise, nonresident youth hunters must purchase a nonresident small game license.

Shooting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to sunset. Youth ages 12 and older need to have passed a certified hunter education course. The daily bag limit and all other regulations for the regular pheasant season apply.

An adult at least 18 years of age must accompany the youth hunter in the field. The adult may not carry a firearm.

See the 2012 North Dakota Small Game Hunting Guide for additional information.

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North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online

Posted: September 20, 2012

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online at http://gf.nd.gov
NDGF upland game biologist Stan Kohn previews Pheasant, Grouse, Partridge, and Turkey hunting seasons. Click here to Watch!

The webcast can be seen on the following community access channels:

Grand Forks
• GFTV Channel 2 – Saturday, 10 p.m.
• UND Studio One Channel 3 – Monday, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.

Dickinson
• Consolidated Channel 18 – Monday, 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Fargo
• TV Fargo Channel 12 – Thursday, noon, and Sunday, 7 p.m.

Bismarck
• Community Access Cable Channel 12, Thursday, 9:30 p.m.

Jamestown
• Cable Services, The Replay Channel, CSi Channel 10

Minot
• Cable Channel 19, Thursday, 6 p.m

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Report Whooping Crane Sightings

Posted:

Whooping cranes are in the midst of their fall migration and sightings will increase as they make their way through North Dakota over the next several weeks. Anyone seeing these birds as they move through the state is asked to report sightings so the birds can be tracked.

Whoopers stand about five feet tall and have a wingspan of about seven feet from tip to tip. They are bright white with black wing tips, which are visible only when the wings are outspread. In flight they extend their long necks straight forward, while their long, slender legs extend out behind the tail. Young-of-the-year whoopers are white with scattered brown feathers. Whooping cranes typically migrate singly, or in groups of 2-3 birds, and may be associated with sandhill cranes.

Other white birds such as snow geese, swans and egrets are often mistaken for whooping cranes. The most common mistake is pelicans because their wingspan is similar and they tuck their pouch in flight, leaving a silhouette similar to a crane when viewed from below.

Anyone sighting whoopers should not disturb them, but record the date, time, location and activity. Observers should also look closely for and report colored bands which may occur on one or both legs.

Whooping crane sightings should be reported to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service office at (701) 387-4397, the North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s main office in Bismarck at (701) 328-6610, or to local game wardens around the state. Reports help biologists locate important whooping crane habitat areas, monitor marked birds, determine survival and population numbers, and identify times and migration routes.

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Game and Fish Summarizes Pheasant Brood Data

Posted: September 19, 2012

North Dakota’s roadside pheasant survey conducted in late July and August suggests much improved production this spring, meaning more young birds added to the population and a better fall population in all areas of the state.

Stan Kohn, upland game management supervisor for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, said the survey shows total pheasants statewide are up 59 percent from last year. In addition, brood observations were up 65 percent, and the average brood size was up 16 percent. The final summary is the result of 255 runs made along 106 brood routes across North Dakota.

“The increase in numbers from last year is encouraging, but hunters are cautioned that the landscape has changed since last fall,” Kohn said. “A great deal of habitat has been either hayed or converted to cropland as Conservation Reserve Program acres continue to diminish.”

Kohn cited several factors for the increase in brood numbers: last winter provided a much needed relief with minimal winter bird mortality which brought most adult hens into spring in good condition; spring weather was near perfect for upland game production, as most first clutches hatched and brood/chick survival was good; and nesting/brooding habitat was in fair condition this spring.

Statistics from southwestern North Dakota indicate the number of broods was up 37 percent and number of birds observed was up 30 percent from 2011. Observers counted 19 broods and 168 birds per 100 miles. The average brood size was 6.5. “Census numbers indicate this district will have the best pheasant numbers in the state this fall,” Kohn said. “A stronger breeding population this spring coupled with good production should provide hunters with plenty of birds and a good number of young birds this fall.”

Results from the southeast show the number of birds observed was up 134 percent from last year, and the number of broods was up 144 percent. Observers counted nine broods and 88 birds per 100 miles. The average brood size was 6.6. “Even though this district shows a large percentage increase, pheasant numbers were pretty low last year,” Kohn said. “With that said, hunters should see more pheasants than in 2011, especially after row crops are harvested.”

Statistics from the northwest indicated pheasants are up 258 percent from last year, with broods up 268 percent. Observers recorded nine broods and 79 birds per 100 miles. Average brood size was 6.3. “Similar to the southeast, hunters should temper expectations because numbers were low in this district last year,” Kohn said. “There will be some areas where pheasant hunting will be slow.”

The northeast district, generally containing secondary pheasant habitat with much of it lacking good winter cover, showed 1.5 broods and 12 birds per 100 miles. Average brood size was 4.9. Number of birds observed was up 155 percent, and the number of broods recorded was up 275 percent. “Hunters should concentrate their efforts in the southern counties of this district for the best potential to find birds,” Kohn said.

The 2012 regular pheasant season opens Oct. 13 and continues through Jan. 6, 2013. The two-day youth pheasant hunting weekend, when legally licensed residents and nonresidents ages 15 and younger can hunt statewide, is set for Oct. 6-7.

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Waterfowl Hunters Reminded of ANS Regulations

Posted: September 18, 2012

Waterfowl hunters are reminded to do their part in preventing the spread of aquatic nuisance species into or within North Dakota.

Waterfowl hunters must remove plants and plant fragments from decoys, strings and anchors; remove plants seeds and plant fragments from waders and other equipment before leaving hunting areas; remove all water from decoys, boats, motors, trailers and other watercraft; and remove all aquatic plants from boats and trailers before leaving a marsh or lake. In addition, hunters are encouraged to brush their hunting dogs free of mud and seeds.

Cattails and bulrushes may be transported as camouflage on boats. All other aquatic vegetation must be cleaned from boats prior to transportation into or within North Dakota.

Detailed ANS information and prevention regulations is available at the North Dakota Game and Fish Department website, gf.nd.gov.

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Watchable Wildlife Photo Contest Deadline Sept. 28

Posted: September 17, 2012

Photographers are reminded that the deadline for submitting photos to the North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s annual Watchable Wildlife Photo Contest is Sept. 28.

The contest has categories for nongame and game species, as well as plants/insects. An overall winning photograph will be chosen, with the number of place winners in each category determined by the number of qualified entries.

Contest entries are limited to digital files submitted on disk or via email. Contestants are limited to no more than five entries. Photos must have been taken in North Dakota.

By submitting an entry, photographers grant permission to Game and Fish to publish winning photographs in North Dakota OUTDOORS magazine, and as part of the magazine on the Department’s website, gf.nd.gov.

Photo disks should be sent to Watchable Wildlife Photo Contest, C/O Patrick T. Isakson, North Dakota Game and Fish Department, 100 N. Bismarck Expressway, Bismarck, ND 58501-5095.

Send emailed digital photos to photocontest@nd.gov. Digital submissions can be either original digital photographs, or scans made from prints or slides/transparencies. Photographers will need to supply the original image if needed for publication.

Photo disks will not be returned. All entries must be accompanied by the photographer’s name, address, phone number and email address if available. Other information such as photo site location and month taken are also useful.

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ND Game and Fish Webcast

Posted: September 13, 2012

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online at http://gf.nd.gov

NDGF hunter education coordinator Zach Peterson discusses the Hunter Education Program and Hunter Safety Tips.  Click here to Watch!

The webcast can be seen on the following community access channels:

Grand Forks

•             GFTV Channel 2 – Saturday, 10 p.m.

•             UND Studio One Channel 3 – Monday, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.

Dickinson

•             Consolidated Channel 18 – Monday, 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.

Fargo

•             TV Fargo Channel 12 – Thursday, noon, and Sunday, 7 p.m.

Bismarck

•             Community Access Cable Channel 12, Thursday, 9:30 p.m.

Jamestown

•             Cable Services, The Replay Channel, CSi Channel 10

Minot

•             Cable Channel 19, Thursday, 6 p.m

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